Skip to Content

Press Releases

Bill Passed to Protect Acadia's Clammers and Wormers

Legislation now heads to president’s desk to be signed into law

Washington, February 26, 2019
Golden and Pingree’s legislation helps add iconic coastline to Acadia National Park, allows clammers and wormers to continue to harvest in intertidal zones around the park, and reauthorizes the Acadia National Park Commission.
WASHINGTON — Today, a bill introduced by Congressmen Jared Golden (ME-02) and cosponsored by Congresswoman Chellie Pingree (ME-01) passed the House of Representatives as part of Senate bill S.47 and will now be sent to the president’s desk to be signed into law. Golden and Pingree’s legislation helps add iconic coastline to Acadia National Park, allows clammers and wormers to continue to harvest in intertidal zones around the park, and reauthorizes the Acadia National Park Commission.
 
“I introduced this legislation to deliver real results for Mainers,” said Congressman Golden. “Our provision, which passed the House today, puts control back in the hands of local folks in Hancock County so they can continue the clamming and worming traditions their parents and grandparents passed down. Our measure also ensures Schoodic Woods can be added to Acadia National Park. I was proud to work across the aisle with the entire Maine delegation to get this bill passed through the House and Senate.”
 
“I’m glad Congress can finally clarify a number of points to strengthen Acadia National Park’s relationship with the surrounding communities of Downeast Maine. Most importantly, it explicitly states that clammers, wormers, and other traditional harvesters can continue working in the places where they have for generations,” Congresswoman Pingree said. "This is a critical step to preserving these traditional and sustainable practices, ensuring that Acadia National Park remains an attraction not only for its natural beauty but for the unique way of life it supports."
 
The legislation, introduced in the House by Golden and cosponsored by Pingree in January, passed as part of the Senate’s public lands package. It would specifically allow harvesters of clams and worms to continue their activities in intertidal zones around Acadia National Park, as they have done for generations. The measure would also permit Acadia National Park to expand to accept a gift of 1,400 acres on the Schoodic Peninsula and permanently reauthorizes the Acadia National Park Advisory Commission, a group of state and local officials, park stakeholders, and members of the public who advise the Secretary of the Interior on the management and development of the park.
 
Back to top